Kamigamo Shrine

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Kamigamo Shrine (Photo: mTaira / Shutterstock.com)

The Kamo Shrines, Shimogamo Shrine and Kamigamo Shrine are both recognized as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. They are two of the most important and oldest shrines in Kyoto. They are located in the north of the city and are intentionally placed to ward off evil and Protect the city In fact, the two Kamo shrines are even older than the city, which became the national capital in 794.

Overview

Address

339 Kamigamo Motoyama, Kita Ward, Kyoto, 603-8047 (Directions)

Hours

5:30 - 17:00 Closed now

Opening Hours

Monday 5:30 - 17:00
Tuesday 5:30 - 17:00
Wednesday 5:30 - 17:00
Thursday 5:30 - 17:00
Friday 5:30 - 17:00
Saturday 5:30 - 17:00
Sunday 5:30 - 17:00
Holidays 5:30 - 17:00

Price

Free entry

Phone Number

075-781-0011

Website

https://www.kamigamojinja.jp/english/

What's unique

  • UNESCO World Heritage Site

General Amenities

  • Prayer rooms
  • Information Counter

Access

20 minutes on foot from Kitaoji Station

15 minutes walk from Kitayama Station

30-minute bus ride #4 Kyoto City Bus from JR Kyoto Station get off at last stop Kamigamo Shrine

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